• warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
  • warning: Memcache::connect() [function.Memcache-connect]: Can't connect to 127.0.0.1:11211, Connection refused (111) in /data/sites/www.easternassociation.com/sites/all/modules/memcache/dmemcache.inc on line 351.
August 26, 1642
August 26, 1642

MELANCHOLIC MONARCH UNDERAWES POPULACE; BETTING ON A RUPERT RALLY?

Charles Stuart, who in driving rain last Thursday hoisted his standard against the Parliament of England, is finding the raising of an army considerably more difficult

The Edinburgh-born Charles, first of that name and the second Scot to occupy the throne of Edward the Confessor, has added less than five hundred horse to the thousand who stood with him on Nottingham's Castle Hill and applauded his vow to “smite the Roundheads and Rebels.” His foot numbers less than three hundred; artillery is conspicuous by its absence. His attempt earlier this month to seize the magazine at Hull was, as readers of Anglia Redivia know, thwarted by the refusal of Sir John Hotham to allow him into the city. Hotham, with Sir Ferdinando Fairfax, is performing admirable service holding the East Riding of Yorkshire for Parliament.

The mood in the camp of the King is described as “melacholic.”

“The whole company gives the appearance of a general dispiritedness,” said an observer. A gust of wind, the observer said, threw the standard into the mud, compounding  the general sense of misery. The reading of the King’s proclamation lacked fire, Charles, a passionate rhetorician, having made last-minute changes that in the wind and rain were illegible to the herald, forcing him to stumble through it with many painful pauses.

Processions to Lincoln and Conventry were met by crowds curious to observe His Highness, and a lack of interest in marching with him described by another observer as “complete in its humiliation.”

The King’s difficulties come even as Phelim O’Neill,  lately arrived from Spain, journeys across Ireland to take command of the rebels gathered in Ulster, and as Henrietta Maria, Charles' French-born queen, seeks shipping in the Low Countries for the arms, gold and like sinews of war there obtained by pawning the Crown Jewels. In the meantime the Earl of Essex, commissioned General by the Parliament early in the month, has gathered at least five thousand to his standard, while London’s Trained Bands, under the captainship of the notable soldier Philip Skippon, declare themselves ready to defend the liberties of the City from any and all enemies, be they Cavalier, Irish, or Spaniard.

PRINCE RUPERT

Papists are welcome in the camp of King Charles. Crossings, bowings, and similar Popish superstitions were widely observed in Nottingham. Charles is reported to have said he will not “examine the conscience” of any man willing to serve him. It’s not known if Sir Francis Windebank, former secretary to Charles, a Papist and Hispanophile, who last year fled to France, and is said by some to be undertaking the study of Scholasticism and Moral Theology with the Jesuits in Rome, will cross the Channel to pledge life and honor to Charles.

One who has so pledged is Prince Rupert, Count Palatine of the Rhine and Duke of Bavaria, who reached Charles mere hours before the unhappy standard-raising.

The son of Charles’ daughter Elizabeth and the Frederick Elector Palatine, Rupert served with the Prince of Orange at the Reinberg seige in 1633, at Breda in 1637, and with the Swedes the year after. Captured on campaign, he was imprisoned in Linz at the castle of Graff von Kuffstein. Rupert, to his credit, resisted the Graff’s efforts to convert to the Roman superstition, and he remains a staunch Protestant. It is said the Graff’s daughter was much less resistant to the gallantries of Rupert, who was paroled last year on vowing to never lift arms against the Holy Roman Emperor again.

Rupert is no stranger to England, having visited as the guest of Charles in in 1637, when he won widespread acclaim among courtiers and the like for his skill at hunting, and in such amusements as those interminable masques so dear to his uncle. Very tall, with a gift for mathematics and admirable curiosity about mechanical things, he was described by one young lady at Court, the daughter of a ancient West Country family, that with eyes “dark and sad, a Stern yet gentle Face, like Caesar, and a Sweet pleasant twist to his upper Lip, he seems to me a romantic and tragical Hero.” He was, in the estimation of a more sober observer, boastful, impetuous, and not a little annoying in  the usual manner of Germans, but with a keen and practical mind, and a man of spirit and honor.

It’s to be hoped Rupert, a son of the Germany degraded by the wars that have been constant in that miserable land since his father was deposed by the Hapsburgs, will not bring to England the horrifying practices he learned there.

With Rupert travels what he seems to love above all else: “Boy,” a white poodle., given him by Lord Arundell, when Rupert was yet the guest of the amiable Graff von Kuffstein, Rupert is said to be inseparable from little animal. Boy receives more haircuts and grooming than his master, is fed roast beef and capon from the table, and is said to enjoy the singing of choirs

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